How and where to watch Partial Solar Eclipse 2018

How to watch Partial Solar Eclipse 2018 and where to watch Partial Solar Eclipse 2018. Watch this space for more information on Partial Solar Eclipse 2018.

Posted 11 months ago in Current Events, updated 11 months ago.

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Sky watchers are in for a treat today, as the second eclipse of the season, a partial solar eclipse or Aanshik Surya Grahan is set to stun tonight. Read on to find all the answers to any questions you might have about the same.

Also, did you know that a NASA spacecraft captured gorgeous views of a total solar eclipse on Sunday (February 11)? Because it is making us even more excited about the eclipse approaching tonight!

PARTIAL SOLAR ECLIPSE OR AANSHIK SURYA GRAHAN

Coming after the Super Blue Blood Moon with a total lunar eclipse this January, the partial solar eclipse or Aanshik Surya Grahan will occur tonight on February 15, 2018.

 

WHAT TIME WILL THE PARTIAL SOLAR ECLIPSE OF 2018 OCCUR?

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The partial eclipse will begin on February 15 at 6:55 pm UTC (February 16, 12:25 am Indian Standard Time or IST) and reach its maximum point at 8:51 pm UTC (February 16, 2:21 am IST).

Solar Eclipse 2018

 The end of the eclipse would come at 10:47 pm UTC (February 16, 4:17 am IST)

WHERE WILL THE SOLAR ECLIPSE BE VISIBLE?

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 The partial solar eclipse 2018 will be visible in southern South America, including many locations in Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay, and in Antarctica

It will also be visible from some areas of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans

What time can the partial solar eclipse be seen?

Antarctica will experience the partial eclipse between about 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. UTC or 9 a.m. local time. Then, the end of the eclipse will be visible in Uruguay, Argentina, southern Chile, far western Paraguay, and far southern Brazil, according to Wright. This includes two big cities, Buenos Aries and Montevideo. Several million people are in the path of its shadow, Wright said. In Buenos Aries, the eclipse starts at 6:36 p.m. local time and reaches mid-eclipse at 7:13 p.m., according to Wright.

When was the last partial eclipse and when will the next one be?

The number of solar eclipses varies each year, but Wright said there are usually at most two every six months. The last partial solar eclipse took place Sept. 13, 2015, according to Wright. The next partial solar eclipse will be seen this year near the southern coast of Australia on July 13. But don’t expect to see much. “Even there it’s going to be a really thin, not really noticeable,” Wright said.

How can we view the partial solar eclipse?

Like the total solar eclipse last August, eclipse watchers this week need to don protective eclipse glasses or risk damage to their eyes. Experts say viewing the sun with the naked eye during a partial eclipse can burn the retina, which impairs how the brain views images. It can also result in temporary or permanent vision impairment and significant vision loss.


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